Call for National Cyber Security Centre to work with SMEs

Call for more regular engagement between the NCSC and online businesses to combat cyber threats. 

Online business group Digital Business Ireland (DBI) has called for the establishment of a working group which would facilitate greater communication between the National CyberSecurity Centre (NCSC) and SMEs.

This should occur in the form of training, real-time information on live threats and feedback from businesses on the ground, the group said.

“The recent change in tactics by criminal ransomware groups to switch focus from Governments, critical infrastructure and big business to smaller businesses, means that our cybersecurity resilience and policy must also change”

In a letter sent to the Director of the National Cyber Security Centre, DBI commended the work of the NCSC in publishing a number of guidance documents outlining measures businesses can take to prevent and recover from cyber-attacks.

Every business is on the frontline

However, the representative body highlighted its ongoing concern surrounding the lack of communication with businesses.  

“DBI as a representative body for online businesses is uniquely positioned to communicate with a large number of businesses on concerns surrounding cybersecurity,” said DBI chair Ashley McDonnell.

“A working group, led by the NCSC, would act as a forum for businesses to receive real-time information on ongoing threats so that they can quickly adapt and repel possible cyber-attacks”

The working group would also cover longer-term issues such as cyber training as well as provide useful on-the-ground feedback to the National Cyber Security Centre directly from businesses on the front line.

Digital Business Ireland, last year, published a Cybersecurity Guide for its own businesses. However, in an area that is so rapidly changing, rolling advice and information is needed. 

“The recent change in tactics by criminal ransomware groups to switch focus from Governments, critical infrastructure and big business to smaller businesses, means that our cybersecurity resilience and policy must also change. The first step must be to increase engagement with smaller businesses,” McDonnell said.

Main image: DBI chair Ashley McDonnell

John Kennedy
Award-winning ThinkBusiness.ie editor John Kennedy is one of Ireland's most experienced business and technology journalists.

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