Irish firms to spend €715k to make tech sustainable

Irish enterprises will spend close to €715,000 to make their technology more sustainable in 2020.

This is an increase of 24pc on last year, according to a study commissioned by Expleo in Ireland and carried out by TechPro among 143 senior IT professionals and decision-makers in Irish-based businesses

However, despite this 62pc of Ireland’s IT decision makers from medium to large-sized organisations do not believe their organisation is doing enough to make their IT environmentally friendly.

“It’s not just about making financial investments; it’s about looking at the organisation in its entirety to see how technologies and processes can be transformed to enable more sustainable work practices”

The research further revealed that Irish IT leaders anticipate a move towards greater regulations of businesses when it comes to their carbon footprint.

Furthermore, 39pc of respondents think all organisations will be regulated to operate in a carbon neutral manner by 2024.

Next big things: 5G, AI and driverless cars

Man in grey suit with blue tie.

Phil Codd, managing director, Expleo Ireland

In terms of tech trends, as Ireland’s telecoms operators begin the rollout of fifth generation mobile network technology, more than half (55pc) of IT decision-makers anticipate that 5G will be fully operational in Ireland by 2024.

One quarter (24pc) of IT decision-makers predict that artificial intelligence and machine learning will become more reliable than humans in making critical business decisions in the next five years.

Despite more than one-in-four (26pc) respondents predicting that Irish motorists will have the ability to purchase driverless cars by 2024, 62pc believe that Ireland will lag behind other European countries when it comes to ‘smart city’ solutions.

“Our survey has revealed that while Irish businesses are keen to make the move towards carbon neutrality, many still feel that they are not doing enough,” explained Phil Codd, managing director of Expleo Ireland.

“Businesses need to look at every aspect of their organisation to see how they can make positive changes. It’s not just about making financial investments; it’s about looking at the organisation in its entirety to see how technologies and processes can be transformed to enable more sustainable work practices.

“It is interesting to see that while they are optimistic about the rollout of 5G technology and the arrival of driverless cars, Ireland’s IT leaders fail to see Ireland becoming a European leader in smart city solutions. Perhaps this is a reflection of the current IT skills shortage, which means many Irish enterprises don’t have the resources to research and develop new technologies.

“Our research also suggests that Irish organisations are excited about the potential of machine learning and artificial intelligence. Irish businesses are in a position to leverage the power of automation and in doing so, enable employees to concentrate on critical tasks, focus on business growth and propel Ireland forward as a major technology leader,” Codd said.

Written by John Kennedy (john.kennedy3@boi.com)

Published: 3 January, 2020