80% of Ireland’s workforce worked remotely during pandemic

90% of Irish-based workers aged 35-to-44 years who could work remotely would like to do so when pandemic restrictions end.

Eight in 10 (80%) of those in employment have worked remotely at some point since the start of the pandemic, new data from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office reveals.

Of those in employment in the Mid-East Region (Kildare, Louth, Meath and Wicklow) who could work remotely, 93% said they would like to do so after all pandemic restrictions are removed.

“The results show how conditions have changed with 80% of those in employment having worked remotely at some point since the start of the pandemic from just under one in four (23%) having worked remotely at some point before then”

Three in four (75%) respondents who were engaged on home duties and almost seven in 10 (69%) of those unable to work due to longstanding health problems would consider employment if it could be done remotely.

The near future of work in Ireland

In the Mid-East Region (Kildare, Louth, Meath and Wicklow) 59% of all those who would consider moving house if they could work remotely would move to a different county unlike those living in the South-West Region (Cork and Kerry) who were most likely to remain in their own county.

Just 3% of remote workers whose main mode of transport to work prior to the pandemic was a car are making more trips by car on days they remote work.

Almost two in 10 workers (18%) would like to work from a remote work hub or a combination of home and a remote work hub when pandemic restrictions end.

“Since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic (March 2020) the work conditions of those in employment in Ireland has changed dramatically with access to workplaces restricted as part of public health measures,” said CSO statistician Dermot Kinane.

“This is why the CSO has produced ‘Our Lives Online: Remote Work’, which is the second publication to be produced from this Pulse survey as part of the CSO ‘Take Part’ campaign.

“Respondents were asked a series of questions about their current and future working arrangements and the impact remote work has had on their work-life balance. The results show how conditions have changed with eight in 10 (80%) of those in employment having worked remotely at some point since the start of the pandemic from just under one in four (23%) having worked remotely at some point before then.

“This report shows that respondents in employment who could work remotely and living in the Mid-East Region (Kildare, Louth, Meath and Wicklow) as well as those who used public transport and those whose travel time to work before the pandemic was more than one hour were more likely to say they would like to work remotely after all pandemic restrictions are removed,” Kinane said.

The CSO study also found that of those in employment who can remote work, 88% would like to do so when all pandemic restrictions are removed. Of these, nearly three in 10 (28%) said they would like to do so all the time. Six in 10 (60%) said they would like to work remotely some of the time. The remainder (12%) said they would not like to work remotely in the future/

Those aged 35 – 44 years were the age group most likely to want to work remotely all the time (32%).

Just under one in 10 (9%) who rated their home broadband as excellent would not like to work remotely in the future. This figure rose to 15% for those who rated their home broadband as poor.

Almost two-thirds (65%) of those in employment whose job could be done remotely but who have not worked remotely at any point since the pandemic began said they would definitely (49%) or probably (16%) work remotely if the opportunity to do so was available.

Three in 10 (30%) of those in employment whose job could not be done remotely with their current employer would be definitely (18%) or probably (12%) attracted to a new job that could.

Almost six in 10 (58%) of those not in employment would consider taking a job if it could be done remotely.

John Kennedy
Award-winning ThinkBusiness.ie editor John Kennedy is one of Ireland's most experienced business and technology journalists.

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