The Great Churn: 37% of Irish office workers plan to change jobs

Almost a quarter (23%) of office workers surveyed changed their place of employment last year.

Forget the Great Resignation, think instead of the Great Churn as hordes of office workers are changing jobs.

A survey by tech resourcing business I.T. Alliance has revealed that more than a third (37%) of Irish office workers plan on changing jobs this year.

“As things settle back to some form of normality and the future of working takes shape, people are reassessing their careers and won’t hesitate to make the move for better opportunities”

The survey – conducted by Censuswide and involving around 1,000 office workers in Ireland – found that Generation Z respondents are most likely to change roles this year, with 44%2 planning to do so. Millennials (38%3) are second most likely to change roles, followed by over a third (35%4) of Generation X. Meanwhile, Boomers (29%5) are least likely to make the move.

Trading places

Man in suit leaning against window.

Tom Moxon, head of Resourcing Services at I.T. Alliance

The findings also show that almost a quarter (23%) of respondents changed jobs last year and some 63% would like to retrain in a new profession if there were no barriers like money or family commitments.

When assessing potential employers, office workers said respect (72%) is the most important company value they search for, followed by trust (61%) and teamwork (60%).

In terms of their own organisation, the research revealed that more than a fifth (21%6) of respondents disagree their organisation is good at attracting staff.

The survey shows that to secure their next role, almost a third (32%) of office workers plan on using a recruitment agency and 47% believe their employer should use a recruitment agency for vacancies in the future.

Of those surveyed, almost half (49%) think companies that use recruitment agencies have an advantage at attracting the best candidates and some 41% think they are better able to select the right colleague for a role, as opposed to their own organisation.

As for experiences with recruitment agencies, 53% of office workers polled have used one before. The main benefits were cited as access to unadvertised roles (49%), specialist knowledge (41%) and contacts (40%).

“Covid-19 brought about unprecedented change – the recruitment landscape was no exception,” said Tom Moxon, head of Resourcing Services at I.T. Alliance.

“As things settle back to some form of normality and the future of working takes shape, people are reassessing their careers and won’t hesitate to make the move for better opportunities.

“However, there is also a clear desire among office workers to find the right role and the right company, one that shares their values and meets their expectations. In turn, it’s crucial that companies position themselves to attract the best talent and ensure they have the capabilities and bandwidth to both effectively and expediently manage the candidate experience – agility is key.

“As with other areas of business and life, neither workers nor companies should be afraid of engaging a specialist who knows the sector, has the contacts and can invest resources in matching the right person with the right role, project or organisation. Failing to do so could mean missing out on the next great opportunity or the best talent.”

John Kennedy
Award-winning ThinkBusiness.ie editor John Kennedy is one of Ireland's most experienced business and technology journalists.

Recommended